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« Rio Gringa Silent Auction Fundraiser | Main | Sugarloaf Engrish »

April 17, 2009

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Liesl78

Nice article. However, I would like to add on the use of shopping as a verb. Brazilians call it shopping, short for shopping center.
So, they're actually saying "I'm going to the shopping [center]".

Sergio

I agree, but not when Cheryl says you can't go casual, at least, not where I live. I always go casual to the mall and nobody never looked weird to me even because I live in a beach city and people don't care even you spent a whole day in a beach and after all you decide getting snack in a restaurant just wearing some shorts or a speedo (I didn't figure out yet because so many gringos hate speedo or are ashamed of wearing one, LOL) as I use to do sometimes.

Cristina

Brings me back to when I used to live next door in Paraguay and would frequent the Asuncion malls, aptly named "Mariscal Lopez Shopping" and of course "Shopping del Sol" (ie Mall of the Sun). I think they do refer to mall as shopping as opposed to center there. And I loved the pronunciation...sounded like chope-ing.

RogerPenna

Brazilians dont say wrong when saying "I go to the shopping". Shopping is short for Shopping Center (or Centre).

While Mall is the word mostly used in USA, in England they say Shopping Centre.

Americans themselves use the shortened version, since the correct would be SHOPPING MALL, not only "mall".

Wikipedia article names it Shopping Center
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shopping_center

"In most of the world the term shopping centre is used, especially in Europe and Australasia; however shopping mall is also used, predominantly in North America.[1] Shopping precinct and shopping arcade are also used. In North America, the term shopping mall is usually applied to enclosed retail structures (and may be abbreviated to simply mall) while shopping centre usually refers to open-air retail complexes."

Ernest Barteldes

I remember my Brazilian days --- yes, it's very true. Shopping Centers in Brazil are socializing places, and they have bars that serve alcohol (I wrote
a piece on the Ypioca Tavern in Fortaleza for Brazzil.com). It was weird when I relocated to NY and saw what malls looked like here - in fact, they are all in the suburbs, like Staten Island and Queens (Manhattan Mall doesnt count, its becoming a JC Pennys)

Julia

in the north i ve heard people dress up to go shopping also in the suburbs in brazil when plp go to the shopping center they dress up
however in my city in brazil we do go to the shoping center to hang out or eat sumeting but we would never dress up for it
i usually fo in havianas or even clothes straight from the beach

André

Most people are very casuals in the malls I've been to in Rio.

Also, when I was a teenager in an upper middle class school, the uncoolest place to hang out in was the mall. Although it was quite popular with the pre-teen set, teenagers wouldn't want to be caught dead in a mall.

So I don't agree with this at all. Not saying it isn't true but it was not my particular experience.

louboutin

Just one question: how to add your blog into my rrs reader, thanks so much.

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